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BMJ. 1995 Jul 15;311(6998):158-61.

Waist circumference as a measure for indicating need for weight management.

Author information

1
Department of Human Nutrition, University of Glasgow, Royal Infirmary.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To test the hypothesis that a single measurement, waist circumference, might be used to identify people at health risk both from being overweight and from having a central fat distribution.

DESIGN:

A community derived random sample of men and women and a second, validation sample.

SETTING:

North Glasgow.

SUBJECT:

904 men and 1014 women (first sample); 86 men and 202 women (validation sample).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Waist circumference, body mass index, waist:hip ratio.

RESULTS:

Waist circumference > or = 94 cm for men and > or = 80 cm for women identified subjects with high body mass index (> or = 25 kg/m2) and those with lower body mass index but high waist:hip ratio (> or = 0.95 for men, > or = 0.80 women) with a sensitivity of > 96% and specificity > 97.5%. Waist circumference > or = 102 cm for men or > or = 88 cm for women identified subjects with body mass index > or = 30 and those with lower body mass index but high waist:hip ratio with a sensitivity of > 96% and specificity > 98%, with only about 2% of the sample being misclassified.

CONCLUSIONS:

Waist circumference could be used in health promotion programmes to identify individuals who should seek and be offered weight management. Men with waist circumference > or = 94 cm and women with waist circumference > or = 80 cm should gain no further weight; men with waist circumference > or = 102 cm and women with waist circumference > or = 88 cm should reduce their weight.

PMID:
7613427
PMCID:
PMC2550221
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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