Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Ophthalmol. 1995 Jul;120(1):65-74.

Optical coherence tomography of central serous chorioretinopathy.

Author information

1
New England Eye Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To assess the potential of a new imaging technique, optical coherence tomography, for the diagnosis and monitoring of central serous chorioretinopathy. Optical coherence tomography is a novel noninvasive, noncontact imaging modality that produces high longitudinal resolution, cross-sectional tomographs of ocular tissue.

METHODS:

Optical coherence tomography is analogous to ultrasound, except that it uses light rather than sound to obtain higher image resolution in the retina. Cross-sectional tomographs of optical reflectivity within the retina are produced with longitudinal resolution of 10 microns. Optical coherence tomography was used to examine 16 patients at a referral eye center whose initial examination disclosed the clinical diagnosis of central serous chorioretinopathy. The optical coherence tomography results were correlated with slit-lamp biomicroscopy, fundus photography, and fluorescein angiography.

RESULTS:

The cross-sectional view produced by optical coherence tomography was effective in objectively quantifying the amount of serous retinal detachment in the disease. Optical coherence tomography disclosed detachments that were undetected by slit-lamp biomicroscopy. Longitudinal measurements with optical coherence tomography were successfully able to track the resolution of subretinal fluid accumulation.

CONCLUSION:

Optical coherence tomography is potentially useful as a new, noninvasive diagnostic technique for quantitative examination of patients with central serous chorioretinopathy and objectively monitoring the clinical course of the serous retinal detachment in this disease.

PMID:
7611331
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center