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Brain Res Mol Brain Res. 1995 Apr;29(2):336-46.

Properties of a kappa-opioid receptor expressed in CHO cells: interaction with multiple G-proteins is not specific for any individual G alpha subunit and is similar to that of other opioid receptors.

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1
Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA.

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine the coupling pattern of a recently cloned kappa-opioid receptor stably transfected in CHO cells to individual G alpha subunits with subsequent comparison to that observed previously for delta- and mu-opioid receptors. Data presented in the current study indicate the successful stable expression of a kappa-opioid receptor in CHO cells. This is supported by experiments in which ligands with selectivity for kappa-, but not delta- or mu-opioid receptors demonstrated high affinity for the expressed receptor and were able to potently and efficaciously produce inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity. In addition, only kappa-opioid agonists were able to induce dose-dependent increases in the incorporation of [32P]azidoanilido-GTP into four G alpha subunits, three of which were identified as Gi3 alpha, Gi2 alpha and Go2 alpha. Further, the amount of kappa-opioid agonists required to induce 50% maximal labeling of any individual G alpha subunit was similar. Although kappa-opioid agonists produced equivalent maximal labelling of Gi3 alpha, Gi2 alpha and Go2 alpha, significantly less agonist-induced labeling was observed for an unknown G-protein designated as G? alpha. Although these results are slightly different than those observed previously for both delta- and mu-opioid receptors, it appears that all opioid receptors stably transfected in CHO cells interact with multiple G-proteins and that this coupling is not selective for any individual G alpha subunit.

PMID:
7609621
DOI:
10.1016/0169-328x(94)00264-f
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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