Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Clin Nutr. 1995 Jul;62(1):1-9.

Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids and depression: when cholesterol does not satisfy.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Membrane Biophysics and Biochemistry, DICBR, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD 20852, USA.

Abstract

Recent studies have both offered and contested the proposition that lowering plasma cholesterol by diet and medications increases suicide, homicide, and depression. Significant confounding factors include the quantity and distribution of dietary n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated essential fatty acids that influence serum lipids and alter the biophysical and biochemical properties of cell membranes. Epidemiological studies in various countries and in the United States in the last century suggest that decreased n-3 fatty acid consumption correlates with increasing rates of depression. This is consistent with a well-established positive correlation between depression and coronary artery disease. Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturate deficiency may also contribute to depressive symptoms in alcoholism, multiple sclerosis, and post-partum depression. We postulate that adequate long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid, may reduce the development of depression just as n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may reduce coronary artery disease.

PMID:
7598049
DOI:
10.1093/ajcn/62.1.1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center