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J Appl Behav Anal. 1995 Fall;28(3):285-95.

Increasing complex social behaviors in children with autism: effects of peer-implemented pivotal response training.

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1
Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla 92093-0109, USA.

Abstract

Two children with autism were taught to engage in a variety of complex social behaviors using peer-implemented pivotal response training (PRT), a set of procedures designed to increase motivation and promote generalization. Typical peers were taught to implement PRT strategies by modeling, role playing, and didactic instruction. After training, peers implemented the procedures in the absence of direct supervision in a classroom environment. After the intervention, both children with autism maintained prolonged interactions with the peer, initiated play and conversations, and increased engagement in language and joint attention behaviors. In addition, teachers reported positive changes in social behavior, with the largest increases in peer-preferred social behavior. Further, these effects showed generality and maintenance. Implications of these findings are discussed.

PMID:
7592145
PMCID:
PMC1279826
DOI:
10.1901/jaba.1995.28-285
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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