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Surgery. 1995 Oct;118(4):592-7; discussion 597-8.

Malignancy, mortality, and medicosurgical management of Clostridium septicum infection.

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1
Department of Surgery, Hennepin County Medical Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55415, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Necrotizing Clostridium septicum infections (CSI) have a strong association with malignancy or immunosuppression. To clarify this relationship and determine how it impacted mortality, the experience with CSI at a single institution was reviewed.

METHODS:

Records of all patients admitted to our hospital with culture proven clostridial infection from 1966 through 1993 were reviewed.

RESULTS:

Among patients presenting with clinical gas gangrene, 281 had culture proven clostridial infection and 32 (11.4%) had CSI. The mortality among CSI patients was 56%, whereas 26% of all patients with clostridial infections died (p = 0.001). An associated malignancy was found in 50% of patients with CSI, whereas this was seen in only 11% of patients with other clostridial infections (p = 0.0001 for CSI versus clostridial infection overall). The remaining patients with spontaneous CSI all had evidence of immunosuppression.

CONCLUSIONS:

The high mortality and likelihood of associated malignancy or hematologic disease underscore the importance of a high index of suspicion and the need to search for and treat associated conditions in all patients with CSI.

PMID:
7570310
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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