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J Clin Invest. 1995 Oct;96(4):1887-96.

Neutrophils use both shared and distinct mechanisms to adhere to selectins under static and flow conditions.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, W. K. Warren Medical Research Institute, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City 73104, USA.

Abstract

Both P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and L-selectin are localized on the microvilli of neutrophils and have been implicated in the attachment of neutrophils to P-selectin or E-selectin. We directly compared the attachment and rolling of neutrophils on P-selectin and E-selectin under flow, with emphasis on the functions of PSGL-1 and L-selectin. Flowing neutrophils attached more avidly and rolled at lower velocities on P-selectin than on E-selectin at matched densities. Studies with purified molecules indicated that P-selectin and E-selectin bound to a related site on PSGL-1 that overlapped the epitope for the anti-PSGL-1 mAb PL1. E-selectin bound with lower affinity than P-selectin to this site and also bound to an additional site(s) on PSGL-1.PL1 abolished adhesion of neutrophils to P-selectin under shear or static conditions, whereas DREG-56, a mAb to L-selectin, had no effect on adhesion to P-selectin. PL1 inhibited attachment of neutrophils to E-selectin under flow but not static conditions. DREG-56 also inhibited attachment of flowing neutrophils to E-selectin, and a combination of DREG-56 and PL1 nearly eliminated attachment to E-selectin under flow. These data suggest that PSGL-1 functions cooperatively with L-selectin to mediate optimal attachment of flowing neutrophils to E-selectin but not to P-selectin. Neutrophils attach more efficiently and with greater strength to P-selectin, perhaps because of the higher affinity of P-selectin for the PL1-defined site on PSGL-1.

PMID:
7560080
PMCID:
PMC185825
DOI:
10.1172/JCI118234
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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