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Diabete Metab. 1995 Jun;21(3):162-7.

Comparison of miglitol and glibenclamide in diet-treated type 2 diabetic patients.

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1
Institute of Internal Medicine, University of Turin, Torino, Italy.

Abstract

The efficacy of the new intestinal alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, miglitol, and glibenclamide were compared in a 6-month double-blind controlled protocol involving 100 non-insulin dependent diabetic patients under diet alone. HbA1c levels (initially between 7 and 11%) were reduced (p < 0.05): -0.78 +/- 0.21% after miglitol and -1.18 +/- 0.20% after glibenclamide. The difference between the two treatments was not significant, although glibenclamide appeared to be more active than miglitol at 8 (p = 0.002) and 16 weeks (p = 0.01) but not at 24 weeks. Fasting glycaemia decreased after miglitol (8.7 +/- 0.3 vs 9.6 +/- 0.3 mmol/l, p = 0.005) and after glibenclamide (8.0 +/- 0.3 vs 9.1 +/- 0.3, p = 0.007). After miglitol, a decrease was noted after breakfast (p < 0.001) and lunch (p < 0.001). The same was true for glibenclamide (p = 0.004 and p < 0.001 respectively). A significant reduction in glucose incremental area during a standard meal test was noted at the end of miglitol (p = 0.008) or glibenclamide treatment (p = 0.04). Subgroups of nonresponders to both treatments were identified (10/49 with miglitol, 9/47 with glibenclamide). Side effects were recorded in 10 patients treated with miglitol (flatulence and meteorism, diarrhoea, 1 discontinued therapy) and in 10 treated with glibenclamide (asthenia, sensation of hunger). This study indicates that miglitol is suitable for initial application in diet-resistant Type 2 diabetic patients, providing, a persistent effect and acceptable side effects.

PMID:
7556806
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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