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J Hepatol. 1995 Apr;22(4):416-22.

Soluble E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in primary biliary cirrhosis.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, St. George's Hospital Medical School, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, important in leucocyte adhesion, have recently been detected in soluble form in the circulation. However, their clinical significance remains unclear. Our aims were to determine whether the levels of these molecules are increased in primary biliary cirrhosis, and to relate these to histological disease stage, biochemical measures of liver damage and to lymphocyte activation.

METHODS:

We studied 42 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, nine with primary sclerosing cholangitis, 14 with alcoholic liver disease and 17 healthy subjects. Circulating E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In subgroups of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, hepatic bile acid uptake and excretory rates and T-cell activation were also determined.

RESULTS:

Soluble E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 levels were significantly elevated in primary biliary cirrhosis compared to healthy controls. However, there was no difference between primary biliary cirrhosis and other liver disease groups. In primary biliary cirrhosis, both adhesion molecules correlated with disease stage, but differed in their relationships with specific liver function tests. They did not correlate with either hepatic bile acid uptake or excretion, or lymphocyte activation.

CONCLUSIONS:

We conclude that soluble E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 are elevated in chronic liver diseases. In primary biliary cirrhosis, they reflect the stage of disease and may reflect the degree of leucocyte adhesion and migration.

PMID:
7545197
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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