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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1995 Aug 15;92(17):8059-63.

Construction, purification, and functional incorporation on tumor cells of glycolipid-anchored human B7-1 (CD80).

Author information

1
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.

Abstract

To generate a potent cell-mediated immune response, at least two signals are required by T cells. One is engagement of the T-cell receptor with peptide-bearing major histocompatibility complex molecules. The other signal can be delivered by various molecules on the antigen-presenting cell, such as B7-1 (CD80). Many tumor cells escape immune recognition by failing to express these costimulatory molecules. Transfection of the B7 gene into some murine tumor cells allows for immune recognition and subsequent rejection of the parental tumor. We have studied an alternative approach for the introduction of B7-1 onto the surface of tumor cells. This method involves purified glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins which can spontaneously incorporate their lipid tail into cell membranes. We have created and purified a GPI-anchored B7-1 molecule (called GPI-B7) which is able to bind its cognate ligand, CD28, and incorporate itself into tumor cell membranes after a short incubation. Tumor cells that have been reconstituted with GPI-B7 can provide the costimulatory signal needed to stimulate T cells. These findings suggest an approach for the introduction of new proteins onto cell membranes to create an effective tumor vaccine for potential use in human immunotherapy.

PMID:
7544014
PMCID:
PMC41286
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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