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Neurology. 1995 Nov;45(11):2051-7.

Seizure localization and pathology following head injury in patients with uncontrolled epilepsy.

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1
Department of Neurosciences, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, Newark 07103, USA.

Abstract

We studied seizure localization and surgical pathology in 25 patients who developed intractable complex partial seizures following head trauma. All patients underwent an extensive presurgical evaluation that included MRI, neuropsychological evaluation, and surface EEG monitoring, and 21 had intracranial EEG monitoring. Seizures were successfully localized in nine patients; all nine underwent a surgical procedure and are seizure-free. Six of these patients had a mesial temporal lobe seizure focus, of whom five had a pathologic diagnosis of mesial temporal sclerosis. All five patients who developed mesial temporal sclerosis sustained their head injury at or before age 5 years. The three remaining patients whose seizures were successfully localized had neocortical foci and circumscribed radiographic abnormalities, which were presumed to be secondary to head trauma, and all had successful surgical resections of the epileptogenic focus. The remaining 16 patients sustained later trauma, and all had successful surgical resections of the epileptogenic focus. The remaining 16 patients sustained later trauma and did not have a focal MRI lesion, and their seizures were not adequately localized. We conclude that as a group, seizure foci secondary to head trauma are difficult to localize accurately, and this should deter surgical intervention. There was an association between early head injury (ie, at or before age 5 years) and mesial temporal sclerosis, and this association aided seizure localization and successful surgical intervention. Therefore, under the right circumstances, trauma can be a suitable historical element in the profile of patients in whom epilepsy surgery is successful.

PMID:
7501158
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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