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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1995 Oct;173(4):1329-33.

The impact of initiating a human immunodeficiency virus screening program in an urban obstetric population.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Tennessee, Memphis 38103, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Our purpose was to describe the incidence of human immunodeficiency virus infection and to assess the cost/benefit ratio of universal antenatal human immunodeficiency virus screening.

STUDY DESIGN:

Medical records of women in this urban obstetrics population, from the years 1988 to 1993, were examined. The incidence of known human immunodeficiency virus seropositivity at delivery was determined. The costs of performing human immunodeficiency virus screening, evaluating the disease status, and administering therapy were calculated. These costs were compared with an averaged cost for care and follow-up of infants infected through vertical transmission.

RESULTS:

The incidence of known human immunodeficiency virus seropositivity at delivery approximately doubled since the initiation of a human immunodeficiency virus screening program (0.26% to 0.48%). Obstetric screening added an approximate $100,000 to medical costs. The calculated cost of pediatric follow-up of human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive infants for the first 18 months was estimated at $344,355. In our population, with universal screening and zidovudine therapy, the medical costs could be reduced by $175,500 per year.

CONCLUSION:

A program of voluntary human immunodeficiency virus screening increases the incidence of known human immunodeficiency virus infection. Offering screening and follow-up to all pregnant patients in an urban setting is both cost-effective and medically beneficial.

PMID:
7485348
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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