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Am J Cardiol. 1995 Dec 1;76(16):1152-6.

Fasting hyperinsulinism, insulin resistance syndrome, and coronary artery disease in men and women.

Author information

1
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Montreal Heart Institute, Quebec, Canada.

Abstract

A large segment of the population gradually develops insulin resistance, and the related metabolic syndrome is one of the most frequent causes of atherosclerosis. Searching for a practical indicator of insulin resistance, we studied the correlations between fasting serum insulin level, the general manifestations of insulin resistance syndrome, and various aspects of coronary artery disease in 797 men and 322 women. After we classified patients according to the quartiles of serum insulin level, we noted in the top quartile the presence of practically all manifestations of insulin resistance syndrome in persons of both sexes (e.g., increased waist/hip ratio, body mass index, glucose, uric acid, triglycerides, apolipoprotein B and decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels as well as apolipoprotein A-I/B ratios, and so forth). We also noted a higher prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and type IV hyperlipidemia. Significantly more women in the fourth than in the first quartile had angiographically documented significant stenosis of the coronary arteries (p = 0.0016, odds ratio 2.9, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 5.6) and previous myocardial infarction (p = 0.0297, odds ratio 2.1, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 4.1). Men in both the first and the fourth quartile had a more disturbed lipid profile and a higher prevalence of significant stenoses of coronary arteries and/or previous myocardial infarction than women; there was a tendency toward a lower prevalence of alcohol consumption (p = 0.0503), a higher prevalence of gout (p = 0.0634), and previous myocardial infarction (p = 0.0791) in men in the fourth than in the first quartile.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
7484901
DOI:
10.1016/s0002-9149(99)80326-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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