Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Pediatr Res. 1980 Jan;14(1):34-8.

Sequential effects of acute meconium obstruction on pulmonary function.

Abstract

The relationship between pulmonary function and the migration of meconium to distal airways was determined in 10 rabbits (mean weight 2.6 kg) after insufflation of a meconium-saline mixture (1--2 ml/kg). Animals were anesthetized, cannulated, intubated, and mechanically ventilated with 100% oxygen. Lung mechanical dysfunction was most severe during the early phase of meconium migration, 15 min postinsufflation. Substantial increases in inspiratory lung resistance (RI) and expiratory lung resistance (RE) suggest that the site of obstruction at 15 min was the large airways. A decrease in dynamic lung compliance with unchanged static compliance characterizes the obstruction as partial. At 15 min and throughout the migration process, RE was greater than RI, demonstrating a check-valve effect. This phenomenon was substantiated by an increased functional residual capacity (FRC) in all rabbits, presumably due to gas trapping. Secondary to these changes, marked hypoxemia, hypercapnea, and acidosis developed in spite of assisted ventilation with 100% oxygen. At 60 and 120 min postinsufflation, both RI and RE decreased as compared to 15 min. This suggests that the predominant site of obstruction shifted to medium and small airways concomitant with the migration of meconium. Widespread and uneven distribution of meconium still produced significant frequency dependence of lung compliance. Static compliance remained unchanged, indicating that meconium does not affect surface-active or tissue properties of the lung within 120 min postinsufflation. These data suggest that effective respiratory management after meconium aspiration is dependent on the degree of meconium migration, as reflected by pulmonary mechanics.

PMID:
7360519
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Support Center