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Am J Med. 1981 Mar;70(3):506-10.

Menopause, medroxyprogesterone and breathing during sleep.

Abstract

Twenty-one postmenopausal women were monitored for sleep-disordered breathing and nocturnal oxygen desaturation to evaluate the contribution of progestational hormones to the occurrence of these sleep events. For approximately one month 11 subjects received 30 mg of medroxyprogesterone (MPG) daily, and 10 received placebo tablets in a randomized, double-blind controlled study. Respiration, saturation and electroencephalography were monitored during one night of sleep before and one night after therapy. Contrasted with the low incidence of disordered breathing and desaturation in premenopausal women, 71 percent of the postmenopausal women had such events. In the placebo-treated group, all measured variables of sleep and breathing were identical on the two nights, which suggested that the findings of a single night of sleep monitoring may be representative of other nights of sleep. Although several subjects appeared to show improvement with MPG, only the maximum duration of apnea was significantly reduced the second night (p less than 0.03).

PIP:

21 postmenopausal women were monitored for sleep-disordered breathing and nocturnal oxygen desaturation to evaluate the contribution of progestational hormones to the occurrence of these sleep events. For approximately one month, 11 subjects received 30 mg of medroxyprogesterone (MPG) daily, and 10 received placebo tablets in a randomized, double-blind controlled study. Respiration, saturation and electroencephalography were monitored during one night of sleep before and one night after therapy. Contrasted with the low incidence of disordered breathing and desaturation in premenopausal women, 71% of the postmenopausal women had such events. In the placebo-treated group, all measured variables of sleep and breathing were identical on the 2 nights, suggesting that the findings of a single night of sleep monitoring may be representative of other nights of sleep. Although several subjects appeared to show improvement with MPG, only the maximum duration of apnea was significantly reduced the 2nd night (p0.03). The study supports the observation that disordered breathing and desaturation are similarly frequent in postmenopausal women and in men.

PMID:
7211892
DOI:
10.1016/0002-9343(81)90572-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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