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Am J Epidemiol. 1981 May;113(5):563-74.

The relationship between hormonal pregnancy tests and congenital anomalies: a prospective study.

Abstract

In a prospective study of some 20,000 pregnancies in the Child Health and Development Studies in the San Francisco East Bay area, 226 gravidas were tested for pregnancy with estrogen/progestogen preparations. The two control groups were women who were tested for pregnancy by either a serum or urine test. There were no statistically differences (p greater than 0.05) in the rates of severe congenital anomalies between the hormone test group and the two control groups. The relative risks and the 95% confidence intervals were 1.01 (0.47-2.19) for the hormone/serum test comparison and 1.60 (0.60-4.18) for the hormone/urine test comparison.

PIP:

Several retrospective and prospective studies have positively associated EPP (estrogen/progestogen preparations) with birth defects in the offsprings of exposed gravidas. Some 20,000 pregnancies of women in the Child Health and Development Studies (CHDS) in the San Francisco bay area between 1959 and 1966 were observed longitudinally. Congenital defects of children in the study (ascertained at birth and followed up in subsequent years) include structural aberrations and errors of metabolism. The CHDS study population includes 227 gravidas who were tested for pregnancy with EPP. 2 control groups consisted of those who were tested for pregnancy by either a serum or urine test. No statistically significant differences in the rates of severe congenital defects were observed between the hormonal test group and the 2 control groups (p 0.05). Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were 1.01 (0.45-2.19) for the hormone/serum test comparison and 1.60 (0.60 to 4.18) for the hormone/urine test comparison. An insignificant increased risk for nonsevere genitourinary anomalies as observed in the male infants in the hormone group. Although this study did not confirm the hypothesized association between EPP and congenital anomalies in the CHDS population, the numbers in this series are not large enough to reject the hypothesis either. Further use of hormonal pregnancy tests appears unjustified in the light of the availability of non-risk pregnancy tests.

PMID:
7194580
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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