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Life Sci. 1982 Aug 30;31(9):909-13.

Scopolamine self-administration: cholinergic involvement in reward mechanisms.

Abstract

Naive rats readily learned to self-administer scopolamine, a centrally active anticholinergic antimuscarinic agent, by the intravenous route; drug intake remained constant while response rates decreased with increasing unit dose ((0.005-0.02 mg/kg/infusion). Increases and decreases in scopolamine responding were elicited by pretreatment with muscarinic agonists and antagonists, respectively. An anticholinergic action at muscarinic synapses appears to be sufficient for reinforcing efficacy; such an action may mediate, in part, the addictive properties of other drugs (e.g., opiates and phencyclidine-like hallucinogens) that are known to have anticholinergic effects.

PMID:
7176819
DOI:
10.1016/0024-3205(82)90548-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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