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Dig Dis Sci. 1983 Aug;28(8):673-83.

Budd-Chiari syndrome associated with oral contraceptive steroids. Review of treatment of 47 cases.

Abstract

Oral contraceptive steroids (OCS) have been implicated as the cause of a number of instances of hepatic vein thrombosis (Budd-Chiari syndrome). Survival appears to be related to early diagnosis and treatment, but there does not appear to be a consensus as to the most appropriate management of these patients. Portosystemic shunting has frequently been advocated, although the results have been quite variable. Some patients appear to do well with conservative measures only. In the effort to obtain a clearer understanding of the effects of different medical and surgical therapies in this disorder, we analyzed the treatment of 47 cases associated with OCS, 29 of which were found in the literature and 18 additional cases identified through a questionnaire survey mailed to members of the AASLD. Surgery had been performed in 27 of these 47 patients (57%); 17 patients had been treated medically (36%); two individuals had received unspecified treatment, and one patient died before any treatment could be initiated. In the surgical group 13 patients underwent portosystemic shunt surgery with six surviving up to 5 years. Two patients survived more than 15 months following orthotopic liver transplant and one patient is well after partial hepatectomy. Of 10 patients who underwent exploratory laparotomy (three with the intent to perform a shunt), seven died postoperatively. Mean survival for the surgically treated group was 19.4 months (range 10 days to 7 years). Of those patients treated medically with combinations of diuretics, anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, fibrinolytic agents, and peritoneovenous shunts to control ascites, 11 (65%) have survived from 3 months to 6 years (mean survival 29.0 months). We conclude that a satisfactory response may accompany either medical or surgical management of patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome associated with OCS. Patients with severe occlusive disease may benefit most from surgical decompression of the hepatic veins. However, for those with mild to moderate disease, the proper role for operative intervention remains to be defined.

PIP:

Oral contraceptives (OCs) have been implicated as the cause of a number of instances of hepatic vein thrombosis (Budd-Chiari syndrome). Survival appears to be related to early diagnosis and treatment, but there does not appear to be a consensus as to the most appropriate management of these patients. Portosystemic shunting has frequently been advocated, although the results have been quite variable. Some patients appear to do well with conservative measures only. In the effort to obtain a clearer understanding of the effects of different medical and surgical therapies in this disorder, we analyzed the treatment of 47 cases associated with OCs, 29 of which were found in the literature and 18 additional cases identified through a questionnaire survey mailed to members of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD). Surgery had been performed in 27 of these 47 patients (57%); 17 patients had been treated medically (36%); 2 individuals had received unspecified treatment, and 1 patient died before any treatment could be initiated. In the surgical group, 13 patients underwent portosystemic shunt surgery with 6 surviving up to 5 years. 2 patients survived more than 15 months following orthotopic liver transplant and 1 patient is well after partial hepatectomy. Of 10 who underwent exploratory laparotomy (3 with the intent to perform a shunt), 7 died postoperatively. Mean survival for the surgically treated group was 19.4 months (10 days-7 years). Of those patients treated medically with a combination of diuretics, anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, fibrinolytic agents, and peritoneovenous shunts to control ascites, 11 (65%) have survived from 3 months-6 years (mean survival 29.0 months). We conclude that a satisfactory response may accompany either medical or surgical management of patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome associated with OCs. Patients with severe occlusive disease may benefit from most surgical decompression of the hepatic veins. However, for those with mild to moderate disease, the proper role for operative intervention remains to be defined.

PMID:
6872799
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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