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Women Health. 1983 Spring;8(1):25-34.

The use of obstetrical procedures in the care of low-risk women.

Abstract

Data from birth certificates were used to examine the pattern of obstetrical procedures used in the care of a sample of low-risk women. The data suggests that hospitals with greater technological capabilities and more specialized medical manpower have a greater tendency to use the obstetrical procedures of cesarean section, forceps delivery and drug induced labor. However, the utilization rates of these procedures also varied considerably between hospitals with comparable technology and medical staffs.

PIP:

Data from birth and death certificates of infants were used to examine the pattern of obstetrical procedures used in the care of a sample of low risk women in 15 hospitals in Southeastern Minnesota. 10,521 birth certificates were chosen. Excluded from the analysis were women younger than 19 and older than 34 years; women with any recorded pregnancy complication; women who had a prior fetal death or previous cesarean section; women with any nonpregnancy related medical complication; women carrying more than 1 fetus; and women who were not primiparous with a fetus in the breech position. All had to have at least 7 prenatal visits. Analysis was conducted for 3 years, 1977-1979. The obstetrical procedure used, labor complications, neonatal mortality rate and use of fetal monitors is charted for individual types of hospitals. The data suggests that hospitals with great technological capabilities and more specialized medical manpower have a greater tendency to use the obstetrical procedures of cesarean section, forceps delivery, and drug induced labor. However, the utilization rates of these procedures also varied considerably between hospitals with comparable technology and medical staffs.

PMID:
6868624
DOI:
10.1300/J013v08n01_04
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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