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[Use of antibiotic-resistant Bifidobacterium in treating ulcerative-necrotic enterocolitis in young children].

[Article in Russian]

Abstract

Ulceronecrotic colitis in premature children is accompanied by the development of pronounced intestinal dysbacteriosis characterized by a sharp increase in the number of Escherichia, enterococci, staphylococci and the appearance of opportunistic enterobacteria (Klebsiella, Serratia, Citrobacter, Proteus) in large amounts. Clinical convalescence was observed in 2 weeks in children receiving antibiotic-resistant bifidobacteria with antibiotics and in 3-4 weeks in children receiving commercial bifidobacteria with antibiotics, while children treated only with antibiotics showed no signs of clinical convalescence during the whole course of treatment. After the course of treatment the most effective recovery of the intestinal microflora was observed in the group of patients who had received antibiotics in combination with antibiotic-resistant bifidobacteria. It was manifested by a decrease in the number of Escherichia, Klebsiella, Proteus, Serratia, staphylococci and enterococci simultaneously with an increase in the number of endogenous lactobacilli and bifidobacteria. In those children who had received commercial bifidobacteria in combination with antibiotics or had been treated only with antibiotics the process of the recovery of the intestinal microflora was considerably less pronounced than in the patients of the first group; a decrease in the number of Escherichia, Klebsiella, Proteus and Serratia occurred to a lesser extent, and at the same time an essential increase in the number of enterococci and staphylococci was observed. The level of endogenous lactobacilli and bifidobacteria was considerably reduced. Antibiotic-resistant bifidobacteria actively took in the intestine of the patients. On day 5 after the course of treatment was over their level was (4.3 +/- 0.4) X 10(4) cells/g feces.

PMID:
6837195
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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