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Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1981 May 23;282(6277):1661-3.

Smoking in pregnancy: associations with skinfold thickness, maternal weight gain, and fetal size at birth.

Abstract

Skinfold thickness is an index of subcutaneous fat, and certain maternal conditions during pregnancy affect the skinfold thicknesses of the baby. A study was performed to investigate the effect of smoking on skinfold thickness, maternal weight gain, and fetal size at birth. A total of 452 mothers with normal singleton pregnancies were groups as: non-smokers, light-to-moderate smokers, or heavy smokers. Maternal age, height, parity, and duration of pregnancy were similar in the three groups. Heavy smokers gained significantly less weight than non-smokers, but there was no significant difference in skinfold thickness. Babies born to smokers had lower birth weights and smaller head circumferences and were shorter than those born to non-smokers, but skinfold thicknesses were similar. The presence of a normal layer of subcutaneous fat in babies whose mothers smoked suggests that fetal growth retardation is not caused by nutritional deficiencies.

PMID:
6786420
PMCID:
PMC1505615
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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