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Hoppe Seylers Z Physiol Chem. 1984 Mar;365(3):405-14.

The biochemistry of vitamin B6 is basic to the cause of the Chinese restaurant syndrome.

Abstract

The concept of this basic research was that monosodium L-glutamate could reveal a deficiency of vitamin B6 by the neurological reactions known as the Chinese Restaurant Syndrome. An other amino acid, tryptophan, administered to subjects, is known to reveal a deficiency of vitamin B6 by the excretory xanthurenic acid, etc. The presence and degree of a deficiency of vitamin B6 in 155 students on no supplemental B6 was determined by the differential assay of aspartate transaminase of erythrocytes which also allows each subject to be a control. Twenty-seven of 155 students had extraordinarily low basal specific activities of the transaminase, less than 0.26 mumol pyruvate/(h X 10(8) erythrocytes). These 27 were challenged with glutamate and a placebo. Twelve of 27 revealed the Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, and 15 did not. By double blind trials, the 12 "responders" were treated with pyridoxine and a placebo for twelve weeks, and then were rechallenged with glutamate and a placebo. Decoding showed 3 of 12 received placebo to pyridoxine and then revealed the symptoms of the syndrome again to glutamate; 9 of 12 received pyridoxine and then 8 of 9 failed to respond to glutamate. These results show, p less than 0.01, that the symptoms of the Chinese Restaurant Syndrome to oral glutamate fail to reoccur after treatment which pyridoxine, and that the biochemistry of vitamin B6 is basic to the cause of the Chinese Restaurant Syndrome.

PMID:
6724532
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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