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Arthritis Rheum. 1984 Apr;27(4):388-97.

In vivo and in vitro stimulation of chondrocyte biosynthetic activity in early experimental osteoarthritis.

Abstract

The biosynthesis of proteoglycans in the menisci and articular cartilages of the knee (stifle) of mature beagles was studied in the early stages of experimental osteoarthritis. The rate of proteoglycan synthesis, determined by systemic labeling in vivo at 21, 42, and 84 days after sectioning of the anterior cruciate ligament, was generally found to be 1.5-2.5-fold higher than control in articular cartilages and 3-10-fold higher than control in menisci. The medial meniscus was more stimulated than the lateral meniscus, and the medial tibial plateau under the meniscus was more stimulated than the adjacent tibial area. This area-specific stimulation suggests the involvement of mechanical factors in the cellular response. The rate of proteoglycan synthesis determined in vitro at 7, 14, and 21 days after operation was also about 2-fold higher than control in articular cartilages and about 3-fold higher in menisci. This increase in biosynthetic activity in vitro was confirmed by 35S-autoradiography and appeared to be due to general stimulation of existing chondrocytes, particularly in the middle and deep zones of the articular cartilage and throughout the meniscal cartilage. The rate of proteoglycan synthesis determined in vitro in cartilages from 2-week and 3-week sham operated joints was also increased relative to controls, suggesting that humoral as well as mechanical factors are involved in stimulating chondrocyte activity.

PMID:
6712755
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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