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J Clin Invest. 1984 Jun;73(6):1580-9.

Effect of dietary phosphorus on circulating concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and immunoreactive parathyroid hormone in children with moderate renal insufficiency.

Abstract

The hyperparathyroidism characteristic of patients with moderate renal insufficiency could be caused by decreases in the plasma concentration of ionized calcium (Ca++) evoked by: (a) recurring increases in the plasma concentration of inorganic phosphorus that may be detectable only in the post-prandial period; (b) a reversible, phosphorus-mediated suppression of renal 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1 alpha-hydroxylase that decreases the plasma concentration of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-(OH)2D) enough to decrease both gut absorption and bone resorption of Ca++; (c) both of these. In a group of eight children with moderate renal insufficiency, mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 45 +/- 4 (SE) ml/min per 1.73 M2, ages 6-17 yr, we tested these hypotheses by determining the effect of short term (5 d) restriction and supplementation of dietary intake of phosphorus on the plasma concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D, the serum concentrations of immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and phosphorus, and the fractional renal excretion of phosphorus ( FEPi ). When dietary phosphorus was normal, 1.2 g/d, the serum concentrations of phosphorus throughout the day were not greater than those of normal control children, and the serum concentrations of carboxyl-terminal iPTH (C-iPTH) were greater, 59 +/- 9 vs. 17 +/- 3 mu leq/ml, and unchanging; the serum concentration of intact-iPTH was also greater, 198 +/- 14 vs. 119 +/- 8 pg/ml. The plasma concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D was lower than that of age-matched controls, 27 +/- 3 vs. 36 +/- 2 pg/ml (P less than 0.01). When dietary phosphorus was restricted to 0.35 g/d, the plasma concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D increased by 60% to a mean value not different from that of normal controls, while serum concentrations of C-iPTH and intact-iPTH decreased by 25%, the latter concentration to a mean value not different from that of controls. FEPi decreased from 31 to 9%. When dietary phosphorus was supplemented to 2.4 g/d, the plasma concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D decreased 32%, while those of C-iPTH and intact-iPTH increased by 131 and 45%, respectively; FEPi increased from 27 to 53%. Plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D remained normal and unchanged, and GFR did not change when dietary phosphorus was manipulated. The data demonstrate that in children with moderate renal insufficiency: (a) A normal dietary intake of phosphorus in attended by a decreased circulating concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D and an increased concentration of iPTH, but not by recurring increases in the serum concentration of phosphorus at any time of the day; (b) Dietary phosphorus is, however, a major determinant of the circulating concentrations of both 1,25-(OH)2D and iPTH, which vary inversely and directly, respectively, with dietary intake of phosphorus, and increase and decrease, respectively, to normal values when phosphorus is restricted for 5 d; (c) Restriction and supplementation of dietary phosphorus induces changes in the serum concentration of iPTH that correlate strongly but inversely with those induced in the plasma concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D (r = -0.88, P < 0.001); and (d) The physiologic responsiveness of the renal tubule to changes in dietary phosphorus is to a substantial extent intact. The data provide support for the second hypothesis stated.

PMID:
6547151
PMCID:
PMC437069
DOI:
10.1172/JCI111365
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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