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J Immunol. 1982 Feb;128(2):696-701.

Immunoglobulin production in human mixed lymphocyte cultures: implications for co-cultures of cells from patients and healthy donors.

Abstract

When human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) are cultured in the presence of irradiated allogeneic lymphocytes, the resulting mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) leads to the secretion into the supernatant of substantial amounts of IgM and IgG, derived from nonirradiated responder B lymphocytes. Our data indicate that stimulation to Ig production by responder B cells may result from different types of interactions. First, B cells and monocytes among the irradiated stimulator cells activate T cells in the responder population, which in turn trigger responder B cells to produce Ig; second, "responder" B cells activate irradiated "stimulator" T cells, leading to a "helper" signal, back to the responder B cells and leading to Ig production. The latter system is radiosensitive, because allogeneic T cells, irradiated at a dose of 4000 rad or more, failed to induce Ig production by responder B cells. In some combinations of human allogeneic lymphocytes, the co-culture of the cells leads to inhibition of Ig production, both in the presence and in the absence of PWM. Thus, co-culture of allogeneic cells may cause "positive" as well as "negative" allogeneic effects. The implications of these findings for the interpretation of co-cultures that are aimed at establishing defects in lymphocytes from patients with, for example, immunodeficiencies, who fail to produce Ig in the presence of PWM are discussed.

PMID:
6459383
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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