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Metabolism. 1983 Dec;32(12):1163-5.

Glucose tolerance and hormonal responses in heroin addicts. A possible role for endogenous opiates in the pathogenesis of non-insulin-dependent diabetes.

Abstract

Plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, and growth hormone responses to intravenous glucose stimulation were investigated in 15 heroin-dependent men and in 15 control subjects matched for age, sex, and weight. Although the fasting concentrations of insulin, glucagon, and GH were significantly higher in the heroin addicts, they had markedly reduced plasma insulin responses to intravenous glucose (acute insulin response, calculated as the mean change in insulin levels over 3 to 10 minutes: 10 +/- 5 microU/mL in the addicts v 44 +/- 9 microU/mL in the controls, P less than 0.001) and glucose utilization rates in the diabetic range (KG: 0.96 +/- 0.09%/min in the addicts v 1.65 +/- 0.10%/min in the controls, P less than 0.01). These results show that chronic heroin administration produces a state of fasting hyperinsulinemia even in the absence of obesity, glucose intolerance, and a marked reduction of the first phase of insulin secretion. A possible role for endogenous opiates in the pathogenesis of non-insulin-dependent diabetes is hypothesized.

PMID:
6358781
DOI:
10.1016/0026-0495(83)90065-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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