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Exp Parasitol. 1983 Oct;56(2):207-14.

Plasmodium falciparum: effect of time in continuous culture on binding to human endothelial cells and amelanotic melanoma cells.

Abstract

An in vitro correlate of the binding in vivo of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to capillary and venular endothelium, using cultured human endothelial cells and amelanotic melanoma cells, was previously developed. The effects of different times in continuous culture on binding of erythrocytes infected with nine different isolates of P. falciparum is now reported. Four isolates, which bound at the time they were first tested, rapidly lost the ability to bind after 26-43 days in culture. One of these, the Cameroun isolate, tested 12 h after the blood was obtained from the patient, had the highest rate of binding of all isolates (680 infected erythrocytes per 100 melanoma cells). After 37 days in culture, only 18 infected erythrocytes per 100 melanoma cells bound. Three isolates first tested after 30-62 days in culture bound poorly. In contrast, two others, the Vietnam (VI) and Brazil (It), continued to bind during the period of study. The Brazil (It) isolate studied after 43 days in culture bound 505 infected erythrocytes per 100 melanoma cells; its clone ItG2G1 continued to bind equally well after 400 days in culture. The ultrastructural morphology of knobs on the binding and nonbinding infected erythrocytes were indistinguishable. Since evidence from other studies indicates that knobs are necessary for binding to endothelium, it is proposed that some parasites in continuous culture may not express the molecules responsible for binding, although the morphologic knobs are still present.

PMID:
6352321
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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