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J Clin Invest. 1983 Apr;71(4):837-9.

Evidence for restoration of hepatic glucose processing in type I diabetes mellitus.

Abstract

The role of muscle in the processing of dietary carbohydrate in nine type I diabetic patients was assessed using combined forearm-indirect calorimetry-glucose meal (100 g) studies performed before and after 72 h of artificial beta-cell directed insulin therapy. On conventional insulin therapy, initially elevated arterial glucose concentrations rose markedly, free insulin increased slightly, and the respiratory quotient (R.Q.) did not change during the study. The forearm glucose extraction rate increased significantly over basal at 60 min. After 72 h of artificial beta-cell therapy and while still on the instrument, arterial glucose increased moderately, and free insulin levels increased markedly. The R.Q. increased significantly at 60 and 120 min. The forearm glucose extraction rate increased significantly over basal at 30 and 60 min. Importantly, forearm glucose extraction rates did not differ during the two studies at each of the measured time points. These observations demonstrate that conventional insulin therapy is effective in facilitating glucose entry into muscle. In addition, they suggest that the marked improvement in glucose processing exhibited by type I diabetic patients after 72 h of artificial beta-cell therapy is primarily attributable to the liver. Finally, the data strongly imply that the primary clinical objective of insulin therapy in type I diabetes mellitus should be reactivation of the hepatic component of the glucose disposal system.

PMID:
6339560
PMCID:
PMC436940
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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