Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Environ Health Perspect. 1983 Apr;50:201-8.

Human liver tumors in relation to steroidal usage.

Abstract

Since 1973 a number of investigators have reported an association between liver neoplasia and steroid usage. Through referral material we have examined the histology of over 250 cases of hepatic neoplasia, most in patients receiving steroid medications. The majority have been benign, predominantly focal nodular hyperplasia (55%) and hepatocellular adenoma (39%). The average age was 31.4 years; 83% had significant steroid exposure with an average duration of 71 months for focal nodular hyperplasia and 79.6 months for hepatocellular adenoma. The type of estrogenic agent was predominantly mestranol; however, during the period mestranol was the most frequently used synthetic steroid. A distinct clinical entity of life threatening hemorrhage from the lesion occurred in 31% of patients with hepatocellular adenoma and 9% of patients with focal nodular hyperplasia. Recurrence of benign tumors has occurred in some patients who continued using steroids and regression has been observed in patients who had incomplete tumor removal but discontinued steroid medication. Medial and intimal vascular changes have been present in a large number of the benign tumors. The relationship of these vascular changes to oncogenesis is unclear, but similar lesions have been described in the peripheral vasculature associated with steroid administration. A number of hepatocellular carcinomas have also been seen. Of significance is the young age of these patients and lack of abnormal histology in adjacent nonneoplastic liver. A striking number of the malignant hepatocellular tumors have been of the uncommon type described as "eosinophilic hepatocellular carcinoma with lamellar fibrosis." The epidemiology of liver lesions within this series is difficult to assess, since the material has been referred from very diverse locations.

PIP:

Since 1973, a number of investigators have reported an association between liver neoplasia and steroid usage. Through referral material, we have examined the histology of over 250 cases of hepatic neoplasia, mostly in patients receiving steroids. The majority have been benign, predominantly focal nodular hyperplasia (55%) and hepatocellular adenoma (39%). The average age was 31.4 years; 83% had significant steroid exposure with an average duration of 71 months for nodular focal hyperplasia and 79.6 months for hepatocellular adenoma. The type of estrogenic agent was predominantly mestranol; however, during the period mestranol was the most frequently used synthetic steroid. A distinct clinical entity of life threatening hemorrhage from the lesion occurred in 31% of the patients with hepatocellular adenoma and 9% of patients with focal nodular hyperplasia. Recurrence of benign tumors has occurred in some patients who continued using steroids and regression has been observed in those who had incomplete tumor removal but discontinued steroid medication. Medial and intimal vascular changes have been present in a large number of the benign tumors. The relationship of these vascular changes to oncogenesis is unclear, but similar lesions have been described in the peripheral vasculature associated with steroid administration. A number of hepatocellular carcinomas have also been seen. Significant is the young age of these patients and the lack of abnormal histology in adjacent nonneoplastic liver. A striking number of the malignant hepatocellular tumors have been of the uncommon type described as "eosinophillic hepatocellular carcinoma with lamellar fibrosis." The epidemiology of liver lesions within this series is difficult to assess, since the material has been referred from very diverse locations.

PMID:
6307679
PMCID:
PMC1569247
DOI:
10.1289/ehp.8350201
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center