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Am J Cardiol. 1979 May;43(5):939-45.

Use of apexcardiography to evaluate left ventricular diastolic compliance in human beings.

Abstract

The relation between various relative amplitude measurements of the left apexcardiogram and internally derived indexes of diastolic compliance of the left ventricle was studied in 29 patients. Simultaneous high fidelity recordings of the left apex tracing and left ventricular pressure were obtained in 11 patients without left ventricular disease (group I) and 18 patients with congestive cardiomyopathy (group II). In 204 normal subjects the ratio of the A wave amplitude to the total diastolic deflection (A/D ratio) of the left apexcardiogram was 31.4 +/- 11.4 (mean +/- standard deviation) percent, the ratio of the A wave amplitude to the total height (A/H ratio) 8.9 +/- 4.3 percent and the D/H ratio 30.4 +/- 14.7 percent. The A/D and A/H ratios were significantly (P less than 0.001 and P less than 0.005) increased in group II (69.2 +/- 12.2 percent and 16.8 +/- 8.2 percent, respectively); they were within normal limits in group I. In contrast, the D/H ratio was within normal limits in both groups of patients. The A/D ratio correlated significantly better with specific compliance (deltaV/deltaP.V) (r = -0.87) than did the A/H ratio (r = -0.53), whereas similar correlations were obtained with end-diastolic volume compliance (dV/dPV) (r = -0.61 and r = - 0.64, respectively). In contrast, the D/H ratio correlated significantly only with end-diastolic distensibility index (dV/dP) (r = -0.52). It is concluded that A wave amplitude/total diastolic deflection (A/D) ratio and, to a lesser degree, the A wave amplitude/total height (A/H) ratio of the left apexcardiogram correspond best to diastolic compliance and are useful noninvasive measurements of this property of the left ventricle.

PMID:
433775
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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