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Pediatrics. 1985 Sep;76(3):406-10.

Increased risk of gastrointestinal perforations in neonates mechanically ventilated with either face mask or nasal prongs.

Abstract

Twenty cases of gastrointestinal perforations not associated with necrotizing enterocolitis or a bowel obstruction (GPNN) were reviewed. Fifteen infants suffered perforations during cycle ventilation. Perforations were localized in the stomach, duodenum, ileum, and jejunum. To determine if the type of mechanical ventilation used (ie, face mask, nasal prongs, or endotracheal tube) was associated with GPNN, a matched case-control analysis was performed. Case and control infants were matched by means of Apgar scores, gestational age, and length of time on ventilatory support. The Mantel-Haenszel estimate for estimating odds-ratios was used to determine that infants ventilated with nasal prongs or face mask were more likely to develop a gastrointestinal perforation than control infants ventilated with endotracheal tubes (odds-ratio greater than or equal to 29.6). This risk was associated with both upper gastrointestinal perforations (odds-ratio greater than or equal to 21.0) and lower gastrointestinal perforations (odds-ratio greater than or equal to 15.3). Routine use of mechanical ventilation with either nasal prongs or face mask appears to be associated with an unacceptable risk of gastrointestinal perforations in sick neonates.

PMID:
4034300
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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