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Am J Epidemiol. 1985 Jun;121(6):870-83.

Serum cholesterol and cancer mortality in the Seven Countries Study.

Abstract

In the Seven Countries Study, carried out in Finland, Greece, Italy, Japan, The Netherlands, the United States, and Yugoslavia, among 11,325 "healthy" men aged 40-59 years in 15 years, there were 594 cancer deaths. Among 477 cancer deaths five years after cholesterol measurement, there was a significant excess of lung cancer deaths in the bottom 20% of the cholesterol distributions in the populations. Age, blood pressure, smoking habits, occupation, and relative body weight did not help explain this. A U-shaped relationship between cancer and cholesterol was not seen in any population. Trend analysis with various cutting points indicated increasing risk of lung cancer death at cholesterol levels under 170 mg/dl. The 45 men dead from cancer in the first two years had lower cholesterol levels than their compatriots who died from cancer later but they did not differ in relative weight or fatness. In contrast to relationships for individuals within populations, the highest cancer death rates were in northern Europe, where the general level of cholesterol was also highest. Other characteristics of the populations--age, relative weight, smoking habits, blood pressure, physical activity, and vitamin A and ascorbic acid in the diet--did not help in the attempt to understand the regional differences in cancer mortality. There is no evidence that any of the observed cancer-serum cholesterol relationships among or within the populations involve an effect of serum cholesterol concentration on oncogenesis or cancer mortality but the possibility of such an effect cannot be denied.

PMID:
4014179
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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