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Am Rev Respir Dis. 1986 Mar;133(3):437-43.

Abnormalities in pathways of alveolar fibrin turnover among patients with interstitial lung disease.

Abstract

Fibrin deposition is prominent in the histopathologic features of chronic interstitial lung disease. Human alveolar macrophages can potentially modulate this process because normal macrophages synthesize and express the initial enzymes of both coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways. In the present study, we examined the cell-associated procoagulant activity of macrophages lavaged from patients with sarcoidosis (n = 14) or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (n = 13) and compared the enzyme activities with that of a group of normal volunteers (n = 16). Cells from sarcoid patients had a mean (+/- 1 SD) tissue factor activity of 1,491 +/- 2,160 units/5 X 10(5) cells, as compared with a mean of 480 units (range, 140 to 1,000 units) for normal control subjects. The same cells had a mean plasma Factor VII equivalent of 4.7 ng/10(6) cells, as compared with 0.81 ng/10(6) cells (range, 0.2 to 2.0 ng) for the normal control subjects. The enhanced activity correlated with disease activity as judged by radiographic stage: only patients with Stage II or Stage III disease had consistently elevated procoagulant activity. There was no correlation of procoagulant activity with the percentage of lymphocytes in the alveolar fluid. Cells from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis also had increased tissue factor (mean, 2,980 +/- 2,619 units) but less consistently elevated Factor VII. There was considerable variation in both procoagulant activity and cell differentials between lavage sites in 10 patients in whom 2 separate lobes were studied concurrently. In addition, we examined the plasminogen activator (PA) activities of lavaged cells and concentrated alveolar fluids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
3954252
DOI:
10.1164/arrd.1986.133.3.437
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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