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Biochemistry. 1985 Mar 26;24(7):1694-700.

Control of glycoprotein synthesis. Bovine milk UDPgalactose:N-acetylglucosamine beta-4-galactosyltransferase catalyzes the preferential transfer of galactose to the GlcNAc beta 1,2Man alpha 1,3- branch of both bisected and nonbisected complex biantennary asparagine-linked oligosaccharides.

Abstract

Bovine milk UDPgalactose:N-acetylglucosamine beta-4-galactosyltransferase has been used to investigate the effect of a bisecting GlcNAc residue (linked beta 1,4 to the beta-linked mannose of the trimannosyl core of asparagine-linked complex oligosaccharides) on galactosylation of biantennary complex oligosaccharides. Columns of immobilized lectins (concanavalin A, erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin, and Ricinus communis agglutinin 120) were used to separate the various products of the reactions. Preferential galactosylation of the GlcNAc beta 1,2Man alpha 1,3 arm occurred both in the absence and in the presence of a bisecting GlcNAc residue; the ratio of the rates of galactosylation of the Man alpha 1,3 arm to the Man alpha 1,6 arm was 6.5 in the absence of a bisecting GlcNAc and 2.8 in its presence. The bisecting GlcNAc residue reduced galactosylation of the Man alpha 1,3 arm by about 78% probably due to steric hindrance of the GlcNAc beta 1,2Man alpha 1,3 beta 1,4 region of the substrate by the bisecting GlcNAc. This steric hindrance prevents the action of four other enzymes involved in assembly of complex asparagine-linked oligosaccharides and indicates the importance of the bisecting GlcNAc residue in the control of glycoprotein biosynthesis. The Man alpha 1,3 arm of biantennary oligosaccharides is believed to be freely accessible to enzyme action whereas the Man alpha 1,6 arm is believed to be folded back toward the core. This may explain the preferential action of Gal-transferase on the Man alpha 1,3 arm of both bisected and nonbisected oligosaccharides.

PMID:
3924097
DOI:
10.1021/bi00328a019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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