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Med Hypotheses. 1979 Aug;5(8):843-8.

Sudden-death ischemic heart disease and dietary magnesium intake: is the target site coronary vascular smooth muscle?

Abstract

The etiology of sudden-death ischemic heart disease (SDIHD) remains an enigma. Data will be presented which suggest that SDIHD may be due to hypomagnesemia in and around the coronary arterial and arteriolar vessels. We have found that blood vessels (especially arteries and arterioles) deficient with respect to Mg can undergo constriction and spasm; the greater the reduction in Mg2+, the greater the magnitude of the spontaneous contractile responses. The higher the Ca2+:Mg2+ ratio, the greater are the magnitudes of these contractile responses. A severe deficit in surface membrane Mg2+, in particular, results in intense vasospasm. Using direct in situ high resolution microscopy (3000 x), we have found that a lowering of Mg2+ around perfused arterioles (15--20 microns i.d.) will also result in spontaneous vasoconstriction and, in addition, increased arteriolar resistance, tissue ischemia and reduced venous outflow. We have also found that the constrictor actions of certain circulating vasoconstrictor hormones (i.e., angiotensin, serotonin, acetylcholine) are enhanced when [Mg2+] is lowered below the levels normally found in plasma. Other direct studies, from our laboratory, indicate that [Mg2+]o regulates calcium exchange and content of vascular smooth muscle. In summary, the concept to be presented suggests that a deficiency in dietary Mg2+ is a key factor in the high incidence of mortality noted in SDIHD in nations of the Western world. The hypomagnesemia produces progressive vasoconstriction, vasospasm and ischemia, which, given time, will lead to SDIHD.

PMID:
390330
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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