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Dig Dis Sci. 1985 Oct;30(10):1005-18.

Death due to acute pancreatitis. A retrospective analysis of 405 autopsy cases.

Abstract

A large retrospective autopsy study of patients was analyzed to evaluate the major etiologic and pathologic factors contributing to fatal acute pancreatitis (AP). From an autopsy population of 50,227 patients, 405 cases were identified where AP was defined as the official primary cause of death. AP was classified according to morphological and histological, but not biochemical, criteria. Patients with AP died significantly earlier than a control autopsy population of 38,259 patients. Sixty percent of the AP patients died within 7 days of admission. Pulmonary edema and congestion were significantly more prevalent in this group, as was the presence of hemorrhagic pancreatitis. In the remaining 40% of patients surviving longer than 7 days, infection was the major factor contributing to death. Major etiologic groups in AP were chronic alcoholism; postabdominal surgery; common duct stones; a small miscellaneous group including viral hepatitis, drug, and postpartum cases; and a large idiopathic group comprising patients with cholelithiasis, diabetes mellitus, and ischemia. The prevalence of established diabetes mellitus in the AP group was significantly higher than that observed in the autopsy control series, suggesting that this disease should be considered as an additional risk factor influencing survival in AP. Pulmonary complications, including pulmonary edema and congestion, appeared to be the most significant factor contributing to death and occurred even in those cases where the pancreatic damage appeared to be only moderate in extent. Emphasis placed on the early recognition and treatment of pulmonary edema in all cases of moderate and severe AP should contribute significantly to an increase in survival in this disease.

PMID:
3896700
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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