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J Comp Physiol B. 1985;156(1):3-11.

An allometric comparison of the mitochondria of mammalian and reptilian tissues: the implications for the evolution of endothermy.

Abstract

The effects of body size and phylogeny on metabolic capacities were examined by comparing the mitochondrial capacities of 6 mammalian and 4 reptilian species representing 100-fold body weight ranges. The mammals examined included 3 eutherian, 2 marsupial and a monotreme species and the reptiles 2 saurian, 1 crocodilian and 1 testudine species. The tissues examined were liver, kidney, brain, heart, lung and skeletal muscle. Allometric equations were derived for tissue weights, mitochondrial volume densities, internal mitochondrial membrane surface area densities, tissue mitochondrial membrane surface areas both per gram and per total tissue and summated tissue mitochondrial membrane surface areas. For the mammals and reptiles studied a 100% increase in body size resulted in average increases of 68% in internal organ size and 107% in skeletal muscle mass. Similarly, total organ mitochondrial membrane surface areas increase in mammals and reptiles by an average 54% and for skeletal muscle by an average 96%. These values are similar to increases in standard (54 and 71%) and maximum (73 and 77%) organismal metabolism values found by other authors for mammals and reptiles respectively. Although the allometric exponents (or rates of change with increasing body size) of the mitochondrial parameters in mammals and reptiles are statistically the same, in general the total amount of mitochondrial membrane surface area in the mammalian tissues are four times greater than found in the reptilian tissues.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
3836230
DOI:
10.1007/bf00692920
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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