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South Med J. 1987 Mar;80(3):328-31.

Increased HDL-cholesterol levels with a weight lifting program.

Abstract

Weight training regimens are generally thought not to improve cardiovascular function or lipid parameters. To evaluate this further, we studied 25 men before and after supervised weight training three times each week for eight weeks. Mean plasma HDL-cholesterol level increased significantly with training, from 38.8 to 44.1 plasma HDL-cholesterol level increased significantly with training, from 38.8 to 44.1 mg/dl, while calculated LDL-cholesterol decreased from 132 to 121 mg/dl. Triglyceride values were unchanged. Percent fat decreased from 14% to 12.7% (P less than .05), and muscle mass increased from 32.4 kg before training to 37 kg after training (P less than .05). Maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) increased significantly (from 45.2 to 49.2 ml/kg X min) during the eight-week period. LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were negatively correlated with VO2max but changes in HDL-cholesterol were not accounted for by alterations in VO2max, muscle mass, or percent fat. This study suggests that weight training can be used to increase strength, alter body composition, improve plasma lipids, and enhance cardiovascular function.

PMID:
3824017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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