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J Neurophysiol. 1986 May;55(5):1057-75.

Both striate cortex and superior colliculus contribute to visual properties of neurons in superior temporal polysensory area of macaque monkey.

Abstract

Although the tectofugal system projects to the primate cerebral cortex by way of the pulvinar, previous studies have failed to find any physiological evidence that the superior colliculus influences visual activity in the cortex. We studied the relative contributions of the tectofugal and geniculostriate systems to the visual properties of neurons in the superior temporal polysensory area (STP) by comparing the effects of unilateral removal of striate cortex, the superior colliculus, or of both structures. In the intact monkey, STP neurons have large, bilateral receptive fields. Complete unilateral removal of striate cortex did not eliminate visual responses of STP neurons in the contralateral visual hemifield; rather, nearly half the cells still responded to visual stimuli in the hemifield contralateral to the lesion. Thus the visual properties of STP neurons are not completely dependent on the geniculostriate system. Unilateral striate lesions did affect the response properties of STP neurons in three ways. Whereas most STP neurons in the intact monkey respond similarly to stimuli in the two visual hemifields, responses to stimuli in the hemifield contralateral to the striate lesion were usually weaker than responses in the ipsilateral hemifield. Whereas the responses of many STP neurons in the intact monkey were selective for the direction of stimulus motion or for stimulus form, responses in the hemifield contralateral to the striate lesion were not selective for either motion or form. Whereas the median receptive field in the intact monkey extended 80 degrees into the contralateral visual field, the receptive fields of cells with responses in the contralateral field that survived the striate lesions had a median border that extended only 50 degrees into the contralateral visual field. Removal of both striate cortex and the superior colliculus in the same hemisphere abolished the responses of STP neurons to visual stimuli in the hemifield contralateral to the combined lesion. Nearly 80% of the cells still responded to visual stimuli in the hemifield ipsilateral to the lesion. Unilateral removal of the superior colliculus alone had only small effects on visual responses in STP. Receptive-field size and visual response strength were slightly reduced in the hemifield contralateral to the collicular lesion. As in the intact monkey, selectivity for stimulus motion or form were similar in the two visual hemifields. We conclude that both striate cortex and the superior colliculus contribute to the visual responses of STP neurons. Striate cortex is crucial for the movement and stimulus specificity of neurons in STP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS).

PMID:
3711967
DOI:
10.1152/jn.1986.55.5.1057
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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