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Arch Dis Child. 1987 Aug;62(8):786-91.

Maternal smoking during pregnancy and lower respiratory tract illness in early life.

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1
Department of Child Health, University of Bristol.

Abstract

In a national study of 12,743 children maternal, but not paternal, smoking was confirmed as having a significant influence on the reported incidence of bronchitis and admission to hospital for lower respiratory tract illness during the first five years of life. Reported rates of admissions to hospital for lower respiratory tract diseases were found to be as high in children born to mothers who stopped smoking during pregnancy as in those whose mothers smoked continuously both during and after pregnancy. Rates of admissions to hospital for lower respiratory tract diseases in children whose mothers started smoking only postnatally were no higher than in those whose mothers remained non-smokers. Postnatal smoking seemed to exert a significant influence on the reported incidence of bronchitis, but less than smoking during pregnancy. These findings suggest that maternal smoking influences the incidence of respiratory illnesses in children mainly through a congenital effect, and only to a lesser extent through passive exposure after birth.

PMID:
3662581
PMCID:
PMC1778463
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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