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J Appl Physiol (1985). 1987 Aug;63(2):485-91.

Upstream pressure for systemic to pulmonary flow from bronchial circulation in dogs.

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1
Division of Respiratory Diseases, University of Washington, Seattle 98195.

Abstract

Systemic to pulmonary flow from bronchial circulation, important in perfusing potentially ischemic regions distal to pulmonary vascular obstructions, depends on driving pressure between an upstream site in intrathoracic systemic arterial network and pulmonary vascular bed. The reported increase of pulmonary infarctions in heart failure may be due to a reduction of this driving pressure. We measured upstream element for driving pressure for systemic to pulmonary flow from bronchial circulation by raising pulmonary venous pressure (Ppv) until the systemic to pulmonary flow from bronchial circulation ceased. We assumed that this was the same as upstream pressure when there was flow. Systemic to pulmonary flow from bronchial circulation was measured in left lower lobes (LLL) of 21 anesthetized open-chest dogs from volume of blood that overflowed from pump-perfused (90-110 ml/min) pulmonary vascular circuit of LLL and was corrected by any changes of LLL fluid volume (wt). Systemic to pulmonary flow from bronchial circulation upstream pressure was linearly related to systemic arterial pressure (slope = 0.24, R = 0.845). Increasing Ppv caused a progressive reduction of systemic to pulmonary flow from bronchial circulation, which stopped when Ppv was 44 +/- 6 cmH2O and pulmonary arterial pressure was 46 +/- 7 cmH2O. A further increase in Ppv reversed systemic to pulmonary flow from bronchial circulation with blood flowing back into the dog. When net systemic to pulmonary flow from bronchial circulation by the overflow and weight change technique was zero a small bidirectional flow (3.7 +/- 2.9 ml.min-1 X 100 g dry lobe wt-1) was detected by dispersion of tagged red blood cells that had been injected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
3654407
DOI:
10.1152/jappl.1987.63.2.485
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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