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Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1987 Dec;94(12):1186-91.

Fertility and obstetric history in patients with familial Mediterranean fever on long-term colchicine therapy.

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1
Department of Medicine A, Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel.

Abstract

The obstetric histories were examined for 36 women with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) on long-term colchicine treatment followed for periods ranging between 3 and 12 years. Seven of 28 pregnancies (25%) associated with colchicine therapy ended in miscarriage. Thirteen women (36%) had periods of infertility; these were due to ovulatory dysfunction in six women, to peritoneal adhesions in four and remained unexplained in three women. The rates for miscarriage and infertility are high but are similar to those reported for women with FMF before colchicine therapy was introduced. All 16 infants born to mothers who had taken colchicine during pregnancy were healthy. Currently, we do not advise discontinuation of colchicine before planned pregnancy but recommend amniocentesis for karyotyping and reassurance.

PIP:

The obstetric histories of 36 women with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) on longterm colchicine treatment were followed for periods ranging from 3-12 years and examined. 7 of 28 pregnancies (25%) associated with colchicine therapy ended in miscarriage. 13 women (36%) had periods of infertility; these were due to ovulatory dysfunction in 6 women, to peritoneal adhesions in 4, and were unexplained in 3 women. The rates for miscarriage and infertility are high but are similar to those reported for women with familial Mediterranean fever before colchicine therapy was introduced. All 16 infants born to mothers who had taken colchicine during pregnancy were healthy. Currently, it is not advised that colchicine be discontinued before a planned pregnancy but rather, amniocentesis is recommended for karyotyping and reassurance.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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