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Eur J Biochem. 1988 Aug 1;175(2):275-84.

Complex formation of human thrombospondin with osteonectin.

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1
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Faculté de Médecine Alexis-Carrel, Lyon, France.

Abstract

Human thrombospondin, a 450-kDa glycoprotein isolated from platelets and endothelial cells, specifically interacts with osteonectin, a protein of 30 kDa isolated from bovine bones and human platelets. Using ELISA, purified osteonectin binds to solid-phase-adsorbed thrombospondin with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.7 nM. Binding of thrombospondin to solid-phase-adsorbed osteonectin was also observed (Kd = 0.86 nM). The interaction of thrombospondin with solid-phase-adsorbed osteonectin was significantly decreased (81% inhibition) when using an excess of fluid-phase osteonectin. Thrombospondin-osteonectin complex formation was calcium-dependent as shown by a 50-80% inhibition in the presence of EDTA. None of the proteins known to interact with thrombospondin (fibrinogen, fibronectin, collagen, plasminogen) had a significant inhibitory effect on thrombospondin-osteonectin complex formation. This selective interaction was confirmed by affinity chromatography. Iodinated osteonectin, previously incubated with purified thrombospondin, specifically bound to an anti-thrombospondin monoclonal antibody (P10) linked to protein-A--Sepharose 4B. Elution of the anti-thrombospondin antibody from protein A allowed the recovery of the thrombospondin-osteonectin complex in the eluate, as judged by SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Blotting of purified thrombospondin to osteonectin adsorbed onto nitrocellulose further confirmed complex formation. In addition, when released from thrombin-stimulated platelets, thrombospondin and osteonectin bound to anti-thrombospondin IgG-coated plates indicating that osteonectin was complexed to thrombospondin once the platelet-release reaction has occurred.

PMID:
3402455
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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