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Effect of lower-body positive pressure on postural fluid shifts in men.

Author information

1
Laboratory for Human Environmental Physiology, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035.

Abstract

To quantify the effect of 60 mm Hg lower-body positive pressure (LBPP) on orthostatic blood-volume shifts, the mass densities (+/- 0.1 g.1-1) of antecubital venous blood and plasma were measured in five men (27-42 years) during combined tilt table/antigravity suit inflation and deflation experiments. The densities of erythrocytes, whole-body blood, and of the shifted fluid were computed and the magnitude of fluid and protein shifts were calculated during head-up tilt (60 degrees) with and without application of LBPP. During 30-min head-up tilt with LBPP, blood density (BD) and plasma density (PD) increased by 1.6 +/- 0.3 g.1-1, and by 0.8 +/- 0.2 g.1-1 (+/- SD) (N = 9), respectively. In the subsequent period of tilt without LBPP, BD and PD increased further to + 3.6 +/- 0.9 g.1-1, and to + 2.0 +/- 0.7 g.1-1 (N = 7), compared to supine control. The density increases in both periods were significant (p less than 0.05). Erythrocyte density remained unaltered with changes in body position and pressure suit inflation/deflation. Calculated shifted-fluid densities (FD) during tilt with LBPP (1006.0 +/- 1.1 g.1-1, N = 9), and for subsequent tilt after deflation (1002.8 +/- 4.1 g.1-1, N = 7) were different from each other (p less than 0.03). The plasma volume decreased by 6.0 +/- 1.2% in the tilt-LBPP period, and by an additional 6.4 +/- 2.7% of the supine control level in the subsequent postdeflation tilt period. The corresponding blood volume changes were 3.7 +/- 0.7% (p less than 0.01), and 3.5 +/- 2.1% (p less than 0.05), respectively. Thus, about half of the postural hemo-concentration occurring during passive head-up tilt was prevented by application of 60 mm Hg LBPP.

PMID:
3342792
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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