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J Vasc Surg. 1988 Jan;7(1):60-8.

The use of preoperative exercise testing to predict cardiac complications after arterial reconstruction.

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1
Division of Vascular Surgery, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

To assess the value of exercise testing in the prediction of cardiac risk, 100 patients requiring arterial reconstructive surgery had either treadmill testing or arm ergometry before operation. Thirty-four patients then had abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, 48 had reconstructions for aortoiliac occlusive disease, and 18 had infrainguinal revascularization procedures. Cardiac complications included myocardial infarction in 10%, acute congestive failure in 5%, malignant ventricular arrhythmias in 7%, and cardiac death in 7%. Contingency table analysis showed that patients who achieved less than 85% of their predicted maximum heart rate (PMHR) during exercise testing had a complication rate of 24%, whereas patients who achieved more than 85% of PMHR had a 6% complication rate (p = 0.0396). The degree of ST segment depression during exercise testing was not a significant predictor of cardiac complications. However, patients who had a positive stress test (ST depression more than 1 mm) and achieved less than 85% of their PMHR had a complication rate of 33%, whereas patients with a positive stress test who achieved more than 85% of their PMHR had no complications (p = 0.048). Statistical analysis with a logistic regression model showed two factors to be significant. Patients who achieved a high maximum heart rate during exercise testing had a low probability of developing postoperative cardiac complications (p = 0.04), as did patients who achieved high cardiac work load maximal oxygen uptake (p = 0.03). We conclude that preoperative exercise testing is useful to predict cardiac complications after arterial reconstruction. Patients who are able to achieve more than 85% of their PMHR and a high maximal oxygen uptake represent a low-risk group.

PMID:
3336127
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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