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J Am Coll Cardiol. 1988 Jan;11(1):147-53.

Arrhythmia and prognosis in infants, children and adolescents with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

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1
Division of Cardiovascular Disease, Hammersmith Hospital, London, England.

Abstract

In adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the annual mortality rate from sudden death is 2 to 3%, and the finding of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia during electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring provides a marker of the patient who is at increased risk. In the young, the annual mortality rate from sudden death is even higher, approximately 6%, but the prognostic significance of arrhythmia is unknown. To determine the prevalence of arrhythmia and its relation to prognosis, 2 days of ECG monitoring was performed in 6 infants, 14 children and 33 adolescents with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy receiving no cardioactive medications. An additional 1 to 9 days (median 2) of monitoring was performed in 29 patients. All patients had sinus rhythm; 4 adolescents had episodes of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, a child with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome had symptomatic reentrant atrioventricular tachycardia and 5 adolescents had asymptomatic nonsustained ventricular tachycardia. During follow-up of 1 week to 7 years (median 3 years), five patients died suddenly and two had successful resuscitation from out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation; none of these seven patients had ventricular arrhythmias during 2 to 7 days (median 3) of ECG monitoring. The two patients with ventricular fibrillation, the five with ventricular tachycardia, the one with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and the seven with recurrent syncope or adverse family history, or both, received low dose amiodarone. None of these "high risk" patients died during 6 months to 6 years (median 3 years) of follow-up.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

PMID:
3335690
DOI:
10.1016/0735-1097(88)90181-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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