Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1988 Apr;20(2):150-4.

Resistive training can reduce coronary risk factors without altering VO2max or percent body fat.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Washington University, School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110.

Abstract

Eleven healthy, untrained males (age = 44 +/- 1 yr; range = 40 to 55 yr) were studied to determine the effects of 16 wk of high-intensity resistive training on risk factors for coronary artery disease. Lipoprotein-lipid profiles, plasma glucose and insulin responses during an oral glucose tolerance test, and blood pressure at rest were determined before and after training. The training program resulted in a 13% increase in high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (39 +/- 2 vs 44 +/- 3 mg.dl-1, P less than 0.05), a 43% increase in high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (7 +/- 2 vs 10 +/- 2 mg.dl-1, P less than 0.05), a 5% reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (129 +/- 5 vs 122 +/- 5 mg.dl-1, P less than 0.05), and an 8% decrease in the total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio (5.1 +/- 0.3 vs 4.7 +/- 0.3, P less than 0.01), despite no changes in VO2max, body weight, or percent body fat. Glucose-stimulated plasma insulin concentrations during oral glucose tolerance testing were significantly lower, and supine diastolic blood pressure was reduced (P less than 0.05) as a result of the training program. No changes in any of these variables occurred in a sedentary control group. These findings indicate that resistive training can lower risk factors for coronary artery disease independent of changes in VO2max, body weight, or body composition.

PMID:
3285118
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center