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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1988 Apr;158(4):956-9.

The use of intrauterine contraceptive devices, pelvic inflammatory disease, and Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

Author information

1
Medical Research Consultants, Inc., Chapel Hill, NC 27516.

Abstract

With the same epidemiologic approach taken in a recent study that suggested that oral contraceptive use may not protect against chlamydial pelvic inflammatory disease, the risks of chlamydial pelvic inflammatory disease were evaluated for intrauterine contraceptive device users. Compared with women using no method of contraception, intrauterine contraceptive device users were not found to be at any higher risk of cervical chlamydial infection. Whether this places intrauterine contraceptive device users at no increased risk of chlamydial pelvic inflammatory disease cannot be ascertained from the available data. Further research is needed before any conclusions can be made regarding the risks of chlamydial pelvic inflammatory disease to users of intrauterine contraceptive devices, oral contraceptives, and other contraceptive methods.

PIP:

With the same epidemiologic approach taken in a recent study that suggested that oral contraceptive use may not protect against chlamydial pelvic inflammatory disease, the risks of chlamydial pelvic inflammatory disease were evaluated for intrauterine contraceptive users in Finland, Sweden, Norway, England, New Zealand, and the US. Compared with women using no method of contraception, intrauterine contraceptive device users were not found to be at any higher risk of cervical chlamydial infection. Whether this places intrauterine contraceptive device users at no increased risk of chlamydial pelvic inflammatory disease cannot be ascertained from the available data. Further research is needed to evaluate the risks of cervical infections and pelvic inflammatory disease to users of different contraceptive methods and whether the risks of chlamydial pelvic inflammatory disease among women with cervical chlamydial infection differ for users of different contraceptive methods. The required studies should consider the origins of the pelvic inflammatory disease and risk factors such as the frequency of intercourse, the number of sexual partners, and the temporal relationships between cervical chlamydial infection and current method of contraception. Until the results of these studies are available, the risks of chlamydial pelvic inflammatory disease to oral contraceptive users and IUD users will continue to be debated without the likelihood of arriving at any generally accepted conclusions.

PMID:
3284365
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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