Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cancer Med. 2020 Mar 24. doi: 10.1002/cam4.3012. [Epub ahead of print]

Clinicopathological features, survival outcomes, and appropriate surgical approaches for stage I acinar and papillary predominant lung adenocarcinoma.

Author information

1
Department of Thoracic Surgery, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Whether prognosis differs between lung acinar predominant adenocarcinoma (ACN) and papillary predominant adenocarcinoma (PAP) patients remains controversial. Furthermore, the appropriate surgical plan for each subtype is undetermined.

METHODS:

Data of stage I ACN or PAP patients from 2004 to 2015 were retrospectively reviewed by SEER*Stat 8.3.5. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS) and lung cancer specific survival (LCSS).

RESULTS:

1531 patients (PAP, 484; ACN, 1047) were included. ACN patients had better OS (P = .001) and LCSS (P = .003) than PAP patients. Among stage I ACN patients, lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection (Lob) (P = .001) or segmentectomy (Seg) (P = .003) provided a better OS than wedge resection (Wed). And ACN patients who received Lob had a equivalent LCSS, compared to those who received Seg (P = .895). For patients with PAP in stage I, those who received Lob tended to have a better prognosis than that received Seg (HR of OS, 0.605, 95% CI: 0.263-1.393; HR of LCSS, 0.541, 95% CI: 0.194-1.504) or Wed (HR of OS, 0.735, 95% CI: 0.481-1.123; HR of LCSS, 0.688, 95% CI: 0.402-1.180).

CONCLUSIONS:

Among patients with lung adenocarcinoma in stage I, those with ACN have a better OS and LCSS than that with PAP. For patients with stage I ACN, Seg and Lob, rather than Wed, seem to be an equivalent treatment choice; however, Seg is the prior option because it could preserve more lung function than Lob. For patients with PAP, Lob tends to be a better choice than Wed and Seg, although the prognostic difference between them is nonsignificant.

KEYWORDS:

acinar; lung adenocarcinoma; papillary; surgical procedures; survival

PMID:
32207885
DOI:
10.1002/cam4.3012
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center