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Pulm Pharmacol Ther. 2020 Mar 20:101917. doi: 10.1016/j.pupt.2020.101917. [Epub ahead of print]

Tolerability of nintedanib-related diarrhea in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

Author information

1
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670, Japan. Electronic address: yahirasaw@chiba-u.jp.
2
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670, Japan. Electronic address: mthrsgnm@chiba-u.jp.
3
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670, Japan. Electronic address: jirotera@chiba-u.jp.
4
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670, Japan. Electronic address: ahka4601@chiba-u.jp.
5
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670, Japan. Electronic address: bell_wood_K1@yahoo.co.jp.
6
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670, Japan. Electronic address: keiichiro19841113@yahoo.co.jp.
7
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670, Japan. Electronic address: kawatake@chiba-u.jp.
8
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, International University of Health and Welfare, School of Medicine, Kozunomori 4-3, Narita, Chiba, 286-8686, Japan. Electronic address: tsushimakenji@yahoo.co.jp.
9
Department of Respirology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba, 260-8670, Japan. Electronic address: tatsumi@faculty.chiba-u.jp.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Nintedanib is an important drug for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the drug is discontinued in some patients who present with diarrhea. In this study, we aimed to assess the drug continuation rate in patients who developed diarrhea during nintedanib therapy and to evaluate if antidiarrheal drugs or nintedanib dose reductions improved clinical tolerability and efficacy.

METHODS:

Eighty-six patients with IPF were treated in our institution between December 2015 and March 2018. Among them, 50 patients who experienced nintedanib-related diarrhea were analyzed regarding tolerability and persistence rate.

RESULTS:

In 50 patients who experienced nintedanib-related diarrhea, 26 (n = 11, without reduction and n = 15, with reduction) continuously received nintedanib. Meanwhile, the drug was discontinued in 24 patients (n = 13, without reduction and n = 11, with reduction). In 9 of 24 patients, the drug was discontinued due to diarrhea. The annual rate of decline in forced vital capacity and the duration of nintedanib administration were not significantly different between groups with and without dosage reduction. Moreover, 23, 13, 8, and 2 patients received 1, 2, 3, and 4 agents, respectively. Clostridium butyricum is a probiotic bacterium most commonly used as an antidiarrheal agent. In this study, it was used in 28 of 46 patients. The total durations of nintedanib administration differed significantly according to the number of antidiarrheal drugs taken: 853 ± 221 days, more than three agents; 424 ± 365 days, without an agent (p = 0.043); and 460 ± 142, one agent (p = 0.0003).

CONCLUSIONS:

When diarrhea occurs within a year after using nintedanib, the dose reduction may be acceptable without affecting pulmonary function. Moreover, treatment with multiple antidiarrheals may be a practical option to maintain the use of nintedanib therapy compared with monotherapy and no therapy.

KEYWORDS:

Adverse drug reactions; Diarrhea; Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; Nintedanib; Tolerability

PMID:
32205281
DOI:
10.1016/j.pupt.2020.101917

Conflict of interest statement

Declaration of competing interest MA, KTs and KTa reports receipt of lecture fees from Boehringer Ingelheim Japan.

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